Setup an On-Hours/Off-Hours Schedule in ShoreTel

Set Up An On-Hours Schedule

Before you start, this page in Director requires a special ActiveX control. I’ve posted an article here on how to install this control manually in case your PC security prevents you from installing it automatically on the site.  Just go ahead and install both controls mentioned as you’ll need them when you set up your auto-attendant scheduling.

Step 1 – Log in to Shoreware Director. If you still are entering a password to get into director, check out my article on Active Directory Integration. It will make your life as a ShoreTel admin so much better.

Step 2 – Click on Schedules on the left hand side of the page. You should see the entries for On-Hours, Holiday and Custom Schedules. Click on Add New next to the On-Hours Section. You should see this:

ShoreTel - On Hours Scheduling - Blank

If you don’t see this, you’ll probably get an error and the site asks to install an ActiveX control. If you don’t get the message, please refer to this article to install the control manually.

Step 3 – Give the schedule a name then Select the areas in the grid that represent the times your office or site is open. They will turn blue. You can only do this one day at a time, you can’t just make a big square over the grid to select multiple days at a time.

Say your hours are 8am to 5pm Monday through Friday, and you are closed Saturday and Sunday. What you can do is select 8-5 on Monday, then right click on the blue section and select “Fill Week”. It will fill up the entire week 8-5, then just right click on the Saturday column and select “Delete”, this will remove the selection from Saturday. Do the same thing on Sunday. Here’s how it will look:

ShoreTel - On Hours Scheduling

Of course if you have hours that aren’t the same every day. You’ll want to manually select each time range instead of clicking “Fill Week” if this is the case.

 Step 4 – Before you save, right click on each entry and select “Edit” and make sure the time is right. It’s sometimes hard to see what you’ve selected. You can just change the time on the dialog box and it will adjust it on the grid.

Step 5 – Click Save.

Your schedule is now set up. Anything in white on this schedule is automatically considered to be “Off-Hours” for that schedule. This means you do not need to set up a separate off-hours schedule.

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How To Child Proof Your Internet At Home For Free

A lot of people ask me this and unfortunately it’s one of those hard things to just tell someone how to do verbally. A lot of parents want to filter the internet for their kids, something that I don’t blame them for. I will post a few really hard to bypass methods, but this one is tough enough to get around that your average middle schooler probably won’t have enough skill or knowledge to bypass. It is also super easy to implement.

This is the DNS blocking method of parental control. The great thing about it is that you don’t need any special software on your kid’s computer. This is filtered past the router level and for the most part works very well.

The quick and dirty method of blocking adult content is by using OpenDNS’s preconfigured FamilyShield Method. I would also like to point out that a nice side effect of this method is your internet will be a bit faster as far as finding websites are concerned. A drawback is you might see just a touch more advertising when you make a typo on a web address.

Use Open DNS FamilyShield

Step 1 – Log into your router. You can check my “Setup Home Wi-Fi” article for how to child proof your router. Added benefit, this will keep people on the street out of your home internet service too.

Step 2 – Go to the section where you set up your DHCP server, most of the time this is under network settings. On Cisco/Linksys routers (which I recommend) this actually on the first screen you see (basic setup). Look at the DNS servers. Usually this will have your router address under the fist entry. Change the DNS settings here to:

DNS 1: 208.67.222.123
DNS 2: 208.67.220.123

Click Save

Step 3 – Once these changes are committed (make sure your router address is not in the DHCP server DNS list), reboot everything in your house so they get the new DNS settings.

This is all you should have to do, you may need to reboot things a few times before it takes effect. If you’ve got some weird brand of router this will still work, but you’ll want to go to opendns.com and check out their instructions, they’ve got a pretty comprehensive router database.

Note: If you have AT&T DSL, their tech support people can probably walk you through this. Just tell them you’d like to change your DNS servers to OpenDNS so you can filter the internet for your kids. Just give them the numbers above and they will likely walk you through all this if you have one of their 2WIRE modems.

Now a lot of IT professionals will tell you this is fairly easy to bypass. If you’ve got a kid who’s really good with computers, they might figure out how to bypass it. If you are a parent, e-mail me and I can tell you how to bypass this on your own devices.

I have a somewhat more advanced, more difficult to bypass method involving a Cisco/Linksys router and DD-WRT that I’ll be publishing soon. It’s cheaper than what I consider the BEST method, but definitely not free (unless you’ve already got the router, don’t mind messing with it and don’t mind paying roughly $5 more a month for internet).

Quite frankly this is not the best option but it’s free, and for most families it’s good enough. If you want to know how to do this right and make it tough for your children to get around even if they know that one kid who knows everything about computers, check back here for an article on one of the best pieces of hardware a parent can buy.

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